A Weekend with a Modern Guru

Sadhguru…does the word conjure up the image of a bearded gentleman sitting in the woods, cross-legged and observing silence? If it does, then you will be right but only partially. This South Indian guru does indeed sport a long, flowing beard but he is also a terrific speaker, a certified helicopter pilot, and an avid motorcycle rider. Add to it the occasional golfing trip as time permits and you now have a better picture. Here is a guru who leads life to the fullest and shows by example that one does not need to be a recluse to achieve spirituality.

Sadhguru’s homespun truths have aided millions around the world in their quest for peace and spirituality. His witty retorts and deep throated laughter mask a seriousness, a seriousness that I first encountered in 2011 when I attended his Inner Engineering program in Concord, California. Not knowing what to expect, I entered the program with few preconceived notions. Occasionally, skepticism crossed my mind in the days leading up to the program. What could a forty-something learn that is new about spirituality? And what does “engineering” have to do with all of this anyway? However, I was willing to spend a weekend. In the grand scheme of things, I figured a weekend spent with a “guru’” may not all be wasteful, and even if it was, it was just a weekend.

Suffice to say that that one weekend upended many of my assumptions and fallacies. In an atmosphere crackling with vibrant energy, Sadhguru’s talks tore down walls, uprooted beliefs and cut through to the essential truth – that the source of all wisdom lies within oneself. Over the course of two days, I saw my fellow seekers laugh, cry, and occasionally get hysterical as the master guided the audience through a 21-minute yogic practice. Distilled from ancient sources and adapted to modern needs, the Shambhavi Maha Mudra is an intense yoga sequence that has the ability to prepare oneself to achieve greater levels of consciousness and bliss. Yoga, as Sadhguru points out, is not about contorting one’s limbs or standing on one’s head. In its ultimate form it is ‘union’ with a higher power, a longing that every human being feels. Our individual abilities may vary, and consequently our material success, Sadhguru said, but the ability to attain bliss is universal and achievable.  

Sadhguru’s teachings are not rooted in any one religion or philosophy. The yogic science that he transmits transcends narrow identifications. Bay Area residents are lucky that this globetrotting guru will once again be in their midst to share his wisdom and techniques, an ability to “engineer” oneself to bliss and happiness. No prior knowledge is required.  Just an open mind and a small investment in time – if nothing else we owe it to ourselves for a chance to be blissful. It was an investment that has reaped rich dividends for me and continues to do so.

Find more information at: https://isha.sadhguru.org/us-en/isha-usa/

 

A Teenager’s Reflections on a Family Tradition

Toward the end of September of each year, the South Indian community enters a frenzy of chaos and excitement in preparation for Golu, the exhibition of dolls in honor of Navratri. Golu has been a part of my life for as long as I can remember. Despite living in the United States, my family has followed the tradition religiously. To me, Golu means much more than just a religious holiday. It is a time of the year that I truly appreciate and value the time I spend with my family.

It has become a family tradition to set aside one day to arrange the Golu together. Everyone chips in: Dad sets up the nine steps, each representing one of the nine days of Navarathri while my sister and I argue over who should lug the heavier box of bommais, or dolls, from the garage to the living room to help Mom take off the newspaper wrapped around the dolls to preserve them for the rest of the year. Many of these dolls have been passed down for many generations in my mother’s family. It fascinates me to imagine, upon seeing their old and fragile condition, that these dolls could have survived this long. I think of the care that my mother, grandmother, and great grandmother have taken to ensure the safety of these dolls; to have taken the risk of sending them overseas in order to allow this tradition to continue here.

The dolls come in various sizes, shapes, and colors. Each has its own story. Each has its own form of beauty, grace, and elegance. There are numerous traditional dolls from my great grandmother’s collection that represent characters and scenes from the Ramayana, set in royal courts and battlefields. My mother has brought a modern taste to the golu, by adding dolls from different countries–African, Chinese, and Spanish dolls.

As a child, my favorite dolls were two identical folk dancers with bobbing heads and torsos- one dressed in yellow, and the other in green. I would never get tired of poking their heads and seeing them bob up and down, following them closely with my eyes until I began to feel dizzy. Another, more traditional favorite of mine is the Chettiar Bommai- a fat, bald, cheerful old man selling vegetables along with his wife Chettichi to give him company.

Setting up the dolls and the display is only the beginning. It is customary to invite friends and relatives to our house on one of the nine days, so that they will be able to see and appreciate our Golu. We spend the other eight days traveling to homes of friends and family nearby, or to cities as far away as Fremont or Evergreen, in order to celebrate Golu. While driving so far, socializing, and singing do undoubtedly drain my energy, I adore every minute of the chaos and exhaustion. Meeting friends, looking at each family’s beautiful dolls, eating sweets, and feeling proud and lucky to be part of such a strong culture are only a few of the benefits I receive during this celebration.

At our home, we appreciate the looks of awe from guests as they wonder how we could have put together such a beautiful and large display. This gives us extra pride and satisfaction—knowing that our efforts paid off, that we accomplished this task together. I am now a senior in high school, and this will be my last year living at home and truly experiencing a Golu celebration with my family. The idea of this saddens me, as it has become such a permanent part of my life. I hope to make this Golu the most memorable yet, to give me a final memory of my family and culture to cherish for the next few years when I am away at college.

First published in 2007.

 

Date/Time Event
Oct 4, 2018 - Oct 24, 2018
All Day
Satyajit Ray: Intimate Universes
Satyajit Ray: Intimate Universes
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco CA
Oct 10, 2018 - Oct 19, 2018
5:00 am - 6:30 pm
Navaratari Celebrations
Navaratari Celebrations
Badarikaashrama, San Leandro CA
Oct 17, 2018 - Oct 20, 2018
10:00 am - 11:00 pm
Bay Area Durga Utsav
Bay Area Durga Utsav
Elks Lodge, Santa Clara CA
Oct 17, 2018
6:00 pm
Durga Puja
Durga Puja
Cultural Integration Fellowship, San Francisco CA

Marin County School District and ICE

A small school district in affluent Marin County, California, serving about 2,000 youngsters in the bucolic West Marin towns of Fairfax and San Anselmo, has contracted with Thomson Reuters, a firm linked to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to check on the residential status of its students.

The Ross Valley school district superintendent Rick Bagley entered into a $5,500 contract on the district’s behalf in April of this year. He told Ethnic Media Services that the changes to the district’s residency verification process are to ensure that space in the schools are available for district residents.  Bagley is also vowing to report families it believes to be attending its schools despite living elsewhere directly to the county district attorney for prosecution.

According to Bagley, this move would make life easier for district families and staff. “Why not use a tool that’s been made available?” Bagley responded when Ethnic Media Services asked for the reasons behind this contract. “It’s like using a pencil or a computer,” with verification by the staff presumably the pencil, and the ICE contractor, Thomson Reuters, the computer.

Thomson Reuters is a global corporation, with 45,000 employees and operations in 100 countries, the school district says. Tens of millions of dollars worth of its contracts are with the U.S. government, including two with ICE for a total of $26.7 million. Critics view the district’s contract with Thomson Reuters as likely to discourage families from enrolling their children in Ross Valley schools, especially if they are wary of U.S. immigration authorities.  

Earlier this year, in the Marin county city of Novato, ICE officers tracked and arrested Guatemalan national Hilcias David Garcia Vicente, 35, on March 14 after he’d dropped his daughter off at Loma Verde Elementary School. And Marin’s Sheriff Robert Doyle has made a practice of publicizing the release dates of all inmates, including undocumented detainees, making it easy for ICE agents to apprehend detainees like Vicente away from the glare of publicity.

Californian lawmakers enacted measure  SB 54, in October 2017, making official the state’s “sanctuary” status. Furthermore, the board of supervisors at Marin County filed an amicus brief challenging the federal government’s opposition to SB 54. Given this environment, California officials in education and law enforcement have issued clear guidelines to maintain schools as safe spaces for undocumented parents.

In December 2016, state Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson’s directive stated: “Our schools are not and will not become an arm of the U.S. Customs and Immigration enforcement. Parents should know they are welcome on our school campuses regardless of their immigration status.” And state Attorney General Xavier Becerra ordered that districts, rather than adding to immigrant families’ burdens, “should review their student-enrollment, residency, and data-collection policies and practices … to safeguard against inadvertently discouraging immigrant/undocumented children from enrolling in or attending school because of the content of the enrollment forms or the mechanics of the enrollment process.”

Ethnic Media Services reached out to Marin County’s 12 other school districts to ask if they are taking measures similar to Ross Valley to verify student residences. None reported considering doing so. Across the bay in Piedmont, a city known for its diligence in ensuring that its students are not from surrounding Oakland, school district administrators have not outsourced residency verification.

Thomson Reuters uses the program CLEAR (Consolidated Lead Evaluation and Reporting) — purchased by Bagley — to track the residencies of its investigation pool. CLEAR employs “huge databases of public and proprietary records, starting with data you already have and linking to a variety of content types to easily uncover more about a person or business,” company spokesman Scott Augustine said.

Company marketing materials describe CLEAR as a tool to “solve investigations faster and identify risks associated with your subject,” and “close gaps in your investigation by uncovering hard-to-find information on your subject” for purposes such as anti-money laundering, skip tracing, tax fraud detection, corporate security, child and family services, law enforcement and third-party risk management.

“I don’t know anyone who uses it,” Sylvia Eggers, administrative assistant to the Piedmont district superintendent, told Ethnic Media Services. “It’s just not something we’re interested in.”

At Ross Valley’s Aug. 14 board of trustees meeting, Thomson Reuter’s spokesman Anthony Cicchese tried to assuage the fears of the board. “We do not share any information we would receive from you with any law enforcement agency. Furthermore, we do not ‘upload’ any information you would enter into a CLEAR program. There is no information sharing from you to us,” he stated.

A proposal for an anonymous “snitch” system for reporting suspected out-of-district families, however, was rejected by Ross Valley’s board of trustees, although a much more stringent system of eligibility verification was put in place. Parents lacking a formal lease or property tax statement are now expected to provide a notarized document from their landlord describing their living arrangements. “It seems to fall disproportionately on the socioeconomic-disadvantaged families who may be sharing housing or paying someone as a roommate,” said Ross Valley Charter School Administrator Jennifer Wolf of the new policy requiring formal documents.

This story was produced by Ethnic Media Services and reproduced with permission.

 

Lovesick in San Jose

Check out this movie for yourself on Saturday Oct 20, 2018 in San Jose! Details here: https://indiacurrents.com/events/film-show-lovesick/

I watched Lovesick at the Indian Film Festival of Los Angeles, which comes with the usual homey discord of diasporic film festivals. The people behind me were passing tupperware filled with aloo gobhi. The harangued IFFLA staff member was pleading people to lower their voices as he introduced the filmmakers. I was at once amused — as a film student, I’m usually surrounded by a much more reverential crowd — and admittedly irked — I would like to hear the filmmakers’ introductions and nobody passed me any aloo gobhi. Under the wafting smell of aloo gobhi, I feel at home and alien. It was under these classically clashing circumstances that I watched Lovesick, which also seemed to be trying to navigate pleasing two worlds and settling neither here nor there.

The directors of Lovesick, Ann S. Kim and Priya Giri Desai, were both working at PBS when they came across an article about Dr. Suniti Solomon, the first person to find HIV in India. In the film, we learn that Dr. Solomon is more aptly described as the first person to even look for HIV in India, which she found widespread in sex workers. She then left what she described as “her prestigious academic job” to found a clinic for people with HIV.

Here’s where it begins to get wacky. Through founding the clinic, Dr. Solomon somewhat organically created a matchmaking service to help HIV positive people find partners, a practice which the directors claim is now common in Indian HIV clinics. Ann and Priya decided Dr. Solomon’s story was too big for a throwaway article, and through a mutual connection decided to meet her in person. Eight years later, they birthed Lovesick, a longitudinal documentary on Dr. Solomon’s life and the story of a successful couple she matched.

The film is humorous, poignant and tender. Dr. Solomon matches couples because she too was madly in love for many decades. Her late husband was Christian and she is Hindu, yet, in a tale as old as time, love conquered all. I’m a sucker for a sappy love story, so I was moved when I saw Dr. Solomon read out passionate letters her husband wrote to her, which she now keeps sealed in a ziplock bag. Later, she waters the purple orchids surrounding her husband’s picture. “His favorite flower,” she remarks, standing next to a shelf of Christian and Hindu paraphernalia. We begin to understand why Dr. Solomon is such an advocate for finding love.

Through her matchmaking service, we meet Manu and Karthik, two of her “lovesick” patients. Their faces are not shown for most of the film because HIV is still so taboo in India — best evidenced by a sequence in the film where Manu’s Mother asks if she can say the word “HIV.” Both Manu and Karthik are sweet and lovable, but there is a certain emphasis placed on the fact that neither was “to blame” for contracted HIV. Karthik was given tainted blood and Manu was married to a man who never revealed himself her was HIV positive.

In fact, the communities Indian society would like to blame for HIV, are curiously absent from the film. For example, Dr. Solomon first found HIV in sex workers, yet not a single sex worker is interviewed in the film. We know HIV to predominantly exist in the gay community, but Dr. Solomon’s matchmaking service seems to only match heterosexual, or seemingly heterosexual, couples.  

As sweet and deserving of love as Manu and Karthik are, the fact that they are able to find it is predicated on his Brahmin caste and her educated background, as Dr. Solomon’s staff giddily relay in the matchmaking process.

By the end of the film, Manu and Karthik decide to allow their faces to be shown. The couple even spoke at the screening in New York and have committed to be the public faces for HIV clinics in India.

The film is an homage to the remarkable Dr. Solomon, who passed away before the film was released. At times, she even even goaded men into coming in to receive treatment by telling them they would only find love if they took care of themselves. She understood the interconnectivity between human wellbeing and love — and all of its accoutrements, like desire and compassion — and her own love for others will always be remembered.

Urvashi Pathania is a film-maker who writes from Los Angeles, where she attends the University of Southern California. You can learn more about her at urvashipathania.com.

This review was originally published by India Currents in April, 2018. It was edited by Culture and Media Editor Geetika Pathania Jain.

 

 

From Our Sponsors




Meet Vijay Gupta, MacArthur Genius Award Winner

Vijay Gupta’s trip to being one of the winners of the 2018 MacArthur genius grant started with questions – questions only a musician would know to ask. Nathaniel Ayers was the questioner and Vijay, a violinist with the LA Philharmonic was immediately intrigued. The space where he met Ayers was at Skid Row, where upwards of 60,000 homeless people camp in Los Angeles. Vijay says, “Nathaniel was one of the first African American men to be admitted to the Juilliard school in New York in the 1970s. Due to mental illness, the therapy that he received left him a mere zombie, and he lived within walking distance of where I played in one of the most prestigious cultural institutions in the city. Along with other musicians, I read about him in the Los Angeles Times, and when I met him, I was pretty devastated to see such a brilliant musician living in abject conditions.”

The inequality that existed between playing at LA Philharmonic and the poverty at Skid Row revealed places that were worlds apart. Meeting Nathaniel pushed Vijay to wonder whether, “there were other musicians like Nathaniel who were languishing in a place like Skid Row, silenced by homelessness and poverty

That thought was the impetus for starting Street Symphony an organization dedicated to providing free music programs, mentoring opportunities to budding musicians and much more in LA’s Skid Row. They have now grown to include over 100 professional musicians and have given over 500 concerts at homeless shelters and county jails.

Of playing at Skid row and other facilities, Vijay says, “I was aware of the HIndustani tradition, where the audiences are extremely well-versed and give critical input to the musicians. At the LA Philharmonic, I was used to sitting on stage, with all of us wearing tuxedos in bright lights, with a “wall” between the performers and the audience. Our audiences for Street Symphony would break that decorum. They would applaud between the pieces. We could not just play and leave. They would ask is questions about the composer, and then add telling comments about their feelings when they heard certain parts. It was truly a humbling experience.”

And, at one of these concerts at a county jail, Vijay spoke about the composer Robert Schumann (1810-1856)  who was committed to a mental asylum and who died there, before playing a piece written by him. And then Vijay confides, “I was dumbfounded to have an audience member at the jail look around him and say – Schumann must have been in a place similar to this one. He was comparing his own story to that composer, even if I hadn’t done that as a performer.”

And, these humbling interactions and experiences drive Vijay to this day in running Street Symphony. He says with wonder, “This audience is made up of emotionally astute intelligent empathic and creative people. We make the mistake of looking at the arts as a luxury item.  Why are you taking music to ‘those’ people? – is a question I get asked often. And, the undercurrent is that those people are somehow unworthy. To me, the arts is a way of believing in everyone’s humanity and when we take that away from certain groups, what we are saying is that they don’t deserve access to their own humanity.  Art allows me to connect with people. The way I was brought up, art is a form of sadhana, an act of devotion. In my native Bangla language, I was taught that you worship Shiva in the form of people. To me, a performance by Street Symphony feels like that – a puja performed with deep reverence, committed to the restoration of humanity.”

The MacArthur genius grant comes with a purse of $625,000 with no strings attached and he hopes to use this to chart the future course of Street Symphony.

Learn more about his work at http://streetsymphony.org/

A Weekend with a Modern Guru

Sadhguru…does the word conjure up the image of a bearded gentleman sitting in the woods, cross-legged and observing silence? If it does, then you will be right but only partially. This South Indian guru does indeed sport a long, flowing beard but he is also a terrific speaker, a certified helicopter pilot, and an avid motorcycle rider. Add to it the occasional golfing trip as time permits and you now have a better picture. Here is a guru who leads life to the fullest and shows by example that one does not need to be a recluse to achieve spirituality.

Sadhguru’s homespun truths have aided millions around the world in their quest for peace and spirituality. His witty retorts and deep throated laughter mask a seriousness, a seriousness that I first encountered in 2011 when I attended his Inner Engineering program in Concord, California. Not knowing what to expect, I entered the program with few preconceived notions. Occasionally, skepticism crossed my mind in the days leading up to the program. What could a forty-something learn that is new about spirituality? And what does “engineering” have to do with all of this anyway? However, I was willing to spend a weekend. In the grand scheme of things, I figured a weekend spent with a “guru’” may not all be wasteful, and even if it was, it was just a weekend.

Suffice to say that that one weekend upended many of my assumptions and fallacies. In an atmosphere crackling with vibrant energy, Sadhguru’s talks tore down walls, uprooted beliefs and cut through to the essential truth – that the source of all wisdom lies within oneself. Over the course of two days, I saw my fellow seekers laugh, cry, and occasionally get hysterical as the master guided the audience through a 21-minute yogic practice. Distilled from ancient sources and adapted to modern needs, the Shambhavi Maha Mudra is an intense yoga sequence that has the ability to prepare oneself to achieve greater levels of consciousness and bliss. Yoga, as Sadhguru points out, is not about contorting one’s limbs or standing on one’s head. In its ultimate form it is ‘union’ with a higher power, a longing that every human being feels. Our individual abilities may vary, and consequently our material success, Sadhguru said, but the ability to attain bliss is universal and achievable.  

Sadhguru’s teachings are not rooted in any one religion or philosophy. The yogic science that he transmits transcends narrow identifications. Bay Area residents are lucky that this globetrotting guru will once again be in their midst to share his wisdom and techniques, an ability to “engineer” oneself to bliss and happiness. No prior knowledge is required.  Just an open mind and a small investment in time – if nothing else we owe it to ourselves for a chance to be blissful. It was an investment that has reaped rich dividends for me and continues to do so.

Find more information at: https://isha.sadhguru.org/us-en/isha-usa/

 

Sweet as Honey: Delicious Indian Desserts

Honey was man’s first sweetener. Honey was also an important condiment in medieval times. We crave sweets, as our stone-age forefathers have been deprived of it for centuries. Humans (Homo sapiens) evolved some 50,000 years ago, whereas bees were making honey 40 million years before that. Honeybees as a group probably originated in South East Asia. It seems they developed social behavior and structural identity similar to what we observe in modern honey bees, some 30 million years ago. Apis mellifera, known as the western honey bee, is a commonly domesticated species. It is believed to have originated in Africa and spread later to Europe and Asia. Honey was the staple sweetener in Europe till the 1500s. The name “honey” comes from the English word “huning.” In 1622, European colonists brought these sub-species to Americas. Cooking with honey was a mark of privilege and it was long used for preserving fruits whole or as a jam.
Cave paintings in Spain from 7000 B.C show the earliest records of bee keeping. Honey is also mentioned in Sumerian and Babylonian cuneiform writings from 2100 B.C. From available evidence, we know that humans have been collecting honey for 10,000 years. But the interplay between bees and flowers is understood much later in 1000 A.D.
The pre-historic cave paintings at Bhimbetka in India show men despoiling beehives built on rocks, perhaps around 6000 B.C. Even as early as the Rigvedic period (2nd and 1st century) the Rbhu brothers were credited with building artificial hives of reeds and straws. The Mahabharata (4th century B.C.) has references to apiary keepers, flower gardens and pollen yielding plants, indicating some degree of commercialization by then.
Bees were domesticated in artificial hives both in India and Egypt about 4500 years ago. The earliest record of bee keeping in Egypt is found in the Sun temple (near Cairo) believed to be erected in 2400 B.C. In 1800s, when archaeologists were working in Egypt, they found a large jar of honey, and found that it tasted perfect, even though it was thousands of years old.
Honey is truly an insect product of high nutritive value. The food value of honey may be estimated by the presence of about 80% sugar in it. One should not mistakenly assume that honey is only a plant product because the nectar, pollen and cane-sugar are all secretions from flowers. As they are digested by bees, it gets mixed with their saliva and it soon undergoes certain chemical changes due to the action of enzymes. At this stage sugar (sucrose) is converted into dextrose and levulose. At the same time some ingredients of bees are also added to the mixture and the water content reduces. The whole mixture is then collected in the crop until the honey bee reaches the hive. As the bee reaches the hive this compound is regurgitated in the hive cell and is known as “Honey.”


Honey Dipped Balushahi
IngredientsBahulashi
* 1 cup all-purpose flour
* 2 tsp. yogurt
* 1 tsp. sugar
* 1/2 tsp. baking soda
* 2 tsp. clarified butter
* ghee for deep frying
* Honey for dipping
Method
Mix all the ingredients together, except ghee and honey. Prepare smooth fluffy dough. Divide them into equal parts and shape them as you please. Now, heat the ghee to medium hot (not too smoky) and fry these balushahis to golden brown. Then, dip them in honey until it coats all over it. Serve chilled as a dessert.

Dry Fruits Milkshake
Honey Jar* 3 fresh figs
* 5 dates
* 5 almonds
* 3-4 cashew nuts
* 4-7 pistachios
* 1 large banana
* 2 tsp. honey
* 4 cups of organic milk
Method
Blend all the above mentioned ingredients together till smooth. Serve chilled in tall glasses.

Malar Gandhi is a freelance writer who specializes in Culinary Anthropology and Gourmet Indian Cooking. She blogs about Indian Food at www.kitchentantras.com

First published in May 2017.

Festival Cooking

Festival Samayal—An Offering to the Gods by Viji Varadarajan. Orient Enterprises. March 2006. Paperback. 98 pages. $21.95.

Divali is upon us, and it is time to pull out cookbooks and handwritten recipes to prepare dishes associated with the festival of lights. Viji Varadarajan’s book, Festival Samayal—An Offering to the Gods is a handy manual, and offers recipes associated with the celebration of all the festivals in the Hindu calendar. The South Indian community in the diaspora can use this as a ready reference guide to explain the significance of festivals to youngsters, while using the recipes to cook the appropriate dishes associated with each festival. The photographs by V.K. Rajamani greatly enhance the presentation of the recipes. Page after page of aesthetically designed presentations of dishes can be found. In an email exchange, Viji mentions that she has deliberately tried to make the recipes very simple and easy-to-follow. She has also presented photographs of the ingredients mentioned in the cookbook to help novices shop for groceries before entering the kitchen. Given below is a recipe for badam halwa fom her cookbook.

Badam Halwa
Saffron Almond Fudge

2 ½ cups almonds/badam
1 ¾ cups sugar
1 cup milk
a few strands saffron/kesar
1 cup clarified butter/ghee

1. Soak the badam in hot water for 30 minutes. Peel and bend into a coarse paste, using very little milk and set aside.
2. Prepare the saffron by mashing it in a little warm milk until the milk turns a deep orange.
3. In a deep non-stick saucepan, mix the sugar and almond paste and stir over a medium fire for 5-7 minutes.
4. Add the milk and keep stirring until the paste thickens and begins to leave the sides of the saucepan. Add teh saffron liquid and the freshly melted ghee.
5. Stir for 2 minutes and remove from fire.

Serve this fudge hot or cold. Wrap them up in butter paper or toffee paper or serve in tiny paper cups.

Timely tip: Soak the almonds in a little water and microwave for a couple of minutes. Remove and peel.

First Published on 2007-11-06

Nirupama Vaidhyanathan is the editor of India Currents magazine. 

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